Malaysia PM says release of Indonesian in North Korea case within rules

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Huong and Siti have consistently denied the murder charge and have said they were tricked into carrying out the killing using a toxic nerve agent for what they thought was a prank.

"I feel so happy".

Lawyers for the women have argued all along that they were pawns in a political assassination with clear links to the North Korean Embassy in Kuala Lumpur.

GOOI SOON SENG: We still truly believe that she is merely a scapegoat and she's innocent, as we have already submitted much earlier.

Minh said Vietnam's leaders and the public are closely following the case and asked Malaysia to "ensure a fair trial for Huong and set her free".

According to Dr Mahathir, Siti Aisyah's release was made in accordance with the law. Authorities believe that Kim Jong Un had his half-brother assassinated as part of an effort to consolidate his power after he became the ruler of North Korea.

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Vietnamese Doan Thi Huong, a suspect in the murder of Kim Jong-nam, the half-brother of North Korean leader Kim Jong-un, is set to appear in court on Thursday.

Huong's lawyer, Hisyam Teh Poh Teik, said after Monday's court session that Huong felt Aisyah's discharge was unfair to her because the judge past year had found sufficient evidence to continue the murder trial against both of them. They did not give any reason for the remarkable retreat in their case against her. "We are making representation to the attorney general for Doan to be taken equally.there must be justice".

The Malaysian Chinese Association (MCA), an opposition party, said withdrawing the murder charge against Aisyah was "a fiasco".

Home: Siti Aisyah laughs during a news conference at the airport in Jakarta, Indonesia, yesterday.

But Malaysian Prime Minister Mahathir Mohamad told reporters in parliament that the decision was in line with "the rule of law". The attorney-general agreed to the request last week.

Analysts said Aisyah's release was in part due to politics and the improved relations between Indonesia and Malaysia that have come since Mahathir Mohamad returned to the Malaysian premiership a year ago after the stunning election defeat of Najib Razak. The foreign ministry said in a statement that she was "deceived and did not realise at all that she was being manipulated by North Korean intelligence".

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