Dems turn focus to tax returns - and Trump's loom largest

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Rep. Richard Neal, chairman of the tax-writing House Ways and Means Committee, has said he is all too aware of the political dangers of delving deep into Trump's personal finances.

We have no reason to believe tax evasion is taking place for the simple reason the IRS audits the tax returns of every president and vice president annually while in office.

While Trump has been open to compromise, Democrat leader and Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) said that she would not approve more than $1 for the wall, which she has called "immoral".

"I have asked the administration to be as noninterventionist as I am on that", Pelosi told reporters Thursday morning.

"Is it fair to expect the IRS to enforce federal tax law against the president?" he added. "You have to do it in a very careful way".

All of this is good news, of course, and it seems to be yet another sign that Republicans on Capitol Hill most definitely don't want to see a replay of the five-week shutdown that paralyzed the government and much of Washington from December 22nd until almost the end of January.

In his State of the Union Address, Trump slammed Democrats for their investigations, which are being led by multiple committees and extend beyond the scope of his tax returns.

"I'm not optimistic it'll be something the president can support", Meadows said. This is so that the agreement can be put in the proper legislative form and then go through the process of getting resolved in time to avoid a shutdown next Friday at midnight.

Rep. Adam Schiff (D-CA), chairman of the House Intelligence Committee, said Democrats won't be intimidated, but Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin has suggested he might prevent the release of Trump's tax returns. Now in the majority, my Democrat colleagues can legally attempt to do this with a majority vote in the House, though such a move would set a risky and inappropriate precedent. And the question is, where does it end?

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"Congress is prohibited by law from examining and making public the private tax returns of Americans for political purposes", said Kelly.

Members of both parties have expressed opposition to Trump bypassing Congress by declaring a national emergency at the border, a move that would be certain to produce lawsuits that could block the money. On other occasions, he's also said that there's "nothing to learn from" his returns, that they are "extremely complex" so people "wouldn't understand them", and that Americans who aren't reporters don't "care at all" about what's in them. He has also said his returns are "extremely complex" and that there's "nothing to learn" from them, according to Bloomberg.

"We'll see what the hearing comes out with, but I would expect at some point in time we're going to ask for the president's tax returns", Hoyer predicted.

"I think overwhelmingly the public wants to see the president's tax returns".

Under the federal tax code, the Hill explained, "the chairmen of Congress's tax committees can request tax returns from Treasury and review them in a closed session".

Democratic leaders have argued that the filings could produce a road map for investigations into Trump's tangle of global businesses and provide a cure for anxiety caused by his refusal to share details about his wealth, debt, charitable giving and potential conflicts of interests.

Lawmakers plan to build a case for Neal's authority as chairman to request tax returns, and if the committee gets them, members can then vote to make them available to all House representatives - which would essentially make them public. The committee's work has been delayed by the longest-ever government shutdown, which ground much of Congress's committee work to a halt.

"I'd suspect that Bob Mueller and his team are looking at that already", said Rep. Ron Kind (D-WI), who sits on the Ways and Means Committee, "and hopefully it's part of a report that is submitted to us shortly". "We need to get that as soon as possible now that we have the opportunity to do it, and it ought to be at the top of the list".

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