More than 100 shooting stars expected in weekend’s Perseid meteor shower peak

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Since the earth passes through that trail of comet detritus every year, we get a pretty little show.

The shower is expected to peak on the night of Sunday August 12, though Saturday and Monday will also offer excellent views.

You can still see meteors before and after the Perseid showers peak, and you dont need special equipment.

The meteors will appear to come from the direction of the Perseus constellation in the north-eastern part of the sky, although they should be visible from any point.

Anyone who was disappointed by the brightness of the almost full moon obscuring the Perseid meteor shower past year will have a chance to turn their stargazing luck around this month.

One of the best meteor showers of the year peaks this weekend, and with any luck, you should be able to catch at least a few of the shooting stars for yourself.

At the meteor shower's speak on the night of August 12, you can expect to see between 60 to 70 meteors every hour.

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Swift-Tuttle measures a massive 16 miles, and last passed by Earth in 1992. But the most spectacular long-lasting meteors, known as "Earthgrazers", can be seen when the radiant is still low above the horizon. Better still, viewing conditions this time around are particularly ideal - due to a new moon.

How many meteors will we see?

Unlike other celestial sightings that require a telescope or binoculars, the best way to watch a meteor shower is with the naked eye. As the cosmic junk - many the size of a grain of sand - enters the atmosphere, it burns up in a flash, appearing as "shooting stars" across the sky.

According to Jolene Creighton at Quarks to Quasars, the meteors you'll be able to see during the meteor shower's peak each hour will be blasting into Earth's atmosphere at speeds of around 209,000 kilometres per hour (130,000 miles per hour).

Meteors streak across the night sky during the Orionid meteor shower on October 23, 2016.

If you want a better view by getting away from light pollution, there will be a Night Walk 8-10 p.m. Saturday at the Dade Battlefield Historic State Park, 7200 County Road 603, Bushnell, where its $3 per vehicle.

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