White House aide apologises over 'special place in hell' comment

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Donald Trump says Canadian prime minister Justin Trudeau has "learned" a lesson after criticising him, and it will cost Canada "a lot of money".

Following Trump's departure from the G7 summit, Trudeau said in a press conference that he told the USA president that his steel and aluminum tariffs were "kind of insulting", that Canada "will not be pushed around" and that it would not hesitate to impose retaliatory measures. Trudeau had engaged in "bad-faith diplomacy", Navarro maintained.

Speaking during a press conference following his meeting with North Korean leader Kim Jong-un in Singapore, Trump suggested Trudeau's remarks during the G7, in which he claimed that Canada "will not be pushed around" by the U.S., has soured the relationship between the pair.

Trump's criticisms Tuesday were not as personally barbed as the Twitter storm he unleashed Sunday on Trudeau, when he called the prime minister "very dishonest and weak", among other things.

He said he was trying to send a signal of strength on behalf of the administration, but that his language was inappropriate.

"We are being taken advantage of by virtually every one of those countries", Trump told a news conference on Tuesday.

In a display of calculated aggression, Kudlow thumped the table as he told CNN's State of the Union Trudeau had "stabbed us in the back" and instigated "a betrayal".

-Canada relationship in nothing but positive terms.

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"And that's what bad faith Justin Trudeau did with that stunt press conference", Navarro said. "We just shook hands!'" Trump said Tuesday. Trump refused to endorse the group's joint statement, said Russian Federation should be readmitted, and traded barbs with Trudeau over an intensifying trade conflict.

Canadian Foreign Minister Chrystia Freeland said the USA decision to slap tariffs against Canada on national security grounds was "absurd" and that her country was moving forward "more in sorrow than in anger" with retaliatory tariffs.

"I see the television and he's giving a news conference about how he "will not be pushed around" by the United States".

The admission was a rare act of contrition from US President Donald Trump's White House, where public apologies are few.

Toop was motivated to respond Saturday over U.S. President Donald Trump's warning to Canada to dismantle its supply management system of the dairy industry - or face repercussions. Canadians are "polite, we're reasonable, but we also will not be pushed around", Trudeau said. "It was very friendly", Trump said. And, if I may quote the words of the great Bear Bryant, "when you make a mistake you should admit it, learn from it, don't repeat it".

Earlier on Tuesday at the Washington conference, White House Council of Economic Advisers Chairman Kevin Hassett said the United States and Canada need to "take a deep breath".

Sen. Bob Corker, the Tennessee Republican who chairs the Foreign Relations Committee, said that "you'd have to be not paying attention to know that we've damaged relations" with Canada.

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